How To Convince Your Friends To Go Winter Camping-

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Winter camping is so awesome!

Tent or igloo: that is not the only question. You also have to ask yourself which friend of yours is the most likely to come along. They know it’s cold out. And they also know if there is snow. So before you ask, it’s best to have a few tricks up your sleeve.

Good luck with that. Really. You won’t regret winter camping. See you on the trails!

Winter camping solo is way less fun than it sounds. So many people hang up their boots for the winter. That’s why you must convince them!

10. Ask Your Crazy Friend. Find someone who never stops talking about his/her three-season hardcore exploits. Challenge this person by saying something like, “You haven’t truly experienced [insert name of place], until you’ve seen it in the winter.”

9. Ask Your Fitness Friend. We all have one.  Allow him/her to break trail most of the way.

8. Ask Your Reserved Friend. The weird guy that doesn’t talk much? Guess what else he won’t do much: complain. Boom.

7. Play Up the Novelty Factor. Snow makes everything look better. The campsite that’s stomped all to dirt and littered with bits of trash from lazy campers? Pristine in winter.

6. Appeal To The Inner Gearhead. Down booties, puffy jackets, nylon-walled tents, snow pants with a drop seat? The winter kit is an opportunity to use  a completely different set of gear than in summer.

5. Play Up Your Own Skills. Of course you can keep them warm! You can boil water, dump it in your Nalgene, and use it as a hot water bottle, can’t you?

4. Sleep In Better Campsites. Places that prohibit camping in the summer due to high use will often drop those restrictions if you camp on 4+ feet of snow.

3. When In Doubt, Whitewash. Melting snow for drinking water? Super fun. Digging a wind barrier for your site? Call it campsite customization. And when else can you carve your own picnic table into the snow?

2. Make a Winter Menu. Two things: Cold weather is a good refrigerator AND there’s no guilt from overeating on winter trips.

1. Make Empty Promises.  “Just because it’s cold out, doesn’t mean you have to be.” Say it like you mean it

Thanks to Casey Lyons and Backpacker Magazine:  http://www.backpacker.com/skills/beginner/winter-camping/convince-your-friends-to-go-winter-camping/#sthash.JQahAR4Y.dpuf
 Cover photo from mountainphotographer.com

 

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